Past Projects

Service Delivery Data Storage

(2004) Accountability and Resource Management System (ARMS)

The Accountability and Resource Management System (ARMS) which hosts and supports a web based case management and labour force database system. ARMS is used by many Indigenous Skills and Employment Training Strategy Agreement Holders (ISETSAH, formerly known as ASETS) to meet case management and accountability requirements. As a result of this, ARMS is being used in more than 120 First Nations. Some of the First Nations are ISETS sub agreement holders and use ARMS in that capacity, including all of the BC, ML, and PEI ISETS, and approximately half of the ISETS in Ontario and Manitoba. Other First Nations use ARMS as a labourforce database or to track client participation in various Indigenous Services Canada (ISC, formerly INAC) funded programs.

AES has also successfully conducted several large evaluations for ESDC over the last ten years. These evaluations focused on Indigenous labour market program and involved designing and conducting surveys both on and off reserve.

 

Evaluations

Since 2004, AES has collaborated on a number of projects with Goss Gilroy Inc. (GGI), one of the longest standing evaluation services firms and DPM Research  in Canada These projects include:

 

(2015) Research on Common Indicators for Career and Employment Services
AES/ARMS was part of a Canadian Career Development Foundation (CCDF) team funded by the Policy Research Directorate of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) to develop and conduct research on common indicators in employment and career services. Worked with the project team to help develop the indicators and then designed and developed a web-based system to capture data and report on the indicators developed. After development, the web-based system was deployed to the field and used by groups of employment counselors in New Brunswick, Quebec, and Saskatchewan to capture data on indicators, outcomes, and interventions.

 

(2011-2012). Summative Evaluation of the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships Program – Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) This evaluation assessed the employment impacts of 31 projects funded across Canada to prepare Aboriginal people for long-term employment in jobs resulting from major resource development projects, such as mining, oil and gas, the fisheries. The evaluation involves multiple qualitative and quantitative methods, including econometric analysis of the incremental impacts, using comparison groups and assessments of data and data systems used.

 

(2005-2010) Evaluation of the Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Cluster– AES conducted qualitative research to assist GGI in completing this evaluation for the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch of Health Canada.

 

(2010) Congress of Aboriginal People (CAP) Partnership Research – AES conducted research on effective practices in the development of partnerships between Aboriginal employment service providers, employers and other organizations to create employment opportunities for Aboriginal workers. The methods included a literature review and key informant interviews. A policy paper and a partnership tool kit were developed.

(2010) Congress of Aboriginal People (CAP) Delivery Gaps Research – AES conducted qualitative research to assist GGI in examining service gaps for Aboriginal people under the HRSDC-funded Aboriginal Human Resource Development Agreements (AHRDAs) and identifying approaches to fill these gaps through the new Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy.

 

(2009) The Innu, Inuit and Métis Human Resources Development Strategy (IIMHRDS) Evaluation  – AES was the lead firm under contract to HRSDC to undertake this complex multi-year evaluation project.  The Innu, Inuit and Métis Human Resources Development Strategy (IIMHRDS) evaluation included the integration of several lines of evidence including an environmental scan, detailed data assessment, a survey of over 600 program participants, and extensive analysis of administrative data.

 

(2006) Aboriginal Skills and Employment Partnerships (ASEP) Evaluation
AES was the lead firm under contract to Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC, formerly HRSDC) to undertake this complex multi-year evaluation project.  The design of the ASEP evaluation included an emphasis on the analysis of administrative data to measure program impacts. The evaluation was divided into two phases. The first phase, the formative evaluation phase, included a detailed database assessment and extensive case studies, key informant interviews and focus groups.  The summative phase included a survey of 1,200 participants and analysis to examine impacts using administrative data for participant and comparison cases.